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SARONIC GULF

The Saronic Gulf extends in the west from the famous Corinth canal, a sheer-sided channel carved through the rock of the isthmus that links the Peloponnese to the rest of the Greek mainland, to the western Aegean and Cyclades islands lying to the east.

The origin of the name comes from the mythological king Saron who drowned at the Psifaei lake (modern Psifta). The Saronic Gulf was a string of six entrances to the Underworld, each guarded by a chthonic enemy in the shape of a thief or bandit.

Sailing is popular in the Saronic Gulf which, like the neighbouring Argolic Gulf, benefits from the Attic mainland's partial shelter from the summer Meltemi wind that can reach Force 7 and above further to the east in the Aegean islands.

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Make your own website in a few clicks! Mobirise helps you cut down development time by providing you with a flexible website editor with a drag and drop interface. MobiRise Website Builder creates responsive, retina and mobile friendly websites in a few clicks. Mobirise is one of the easiest website development tools available today. It also gives you the freedom to develop as many websites as you like given the fact that it is a desktop app.

Poseidon Sounio

Where is this? 

Cape Sounio, a world-renowned archaeological site lies 69 km SE of Athens, the location of expensive summer homes at the southern tip of the Attica Peninsula, with the sunset over the Aegean Sea being a sought-after sight. The ancient Temple of Poseidon (444 BC), is perched 60m above the sea with columns made of locally quarried white marble. Poseidon was greatly feared by mariners as his wrath manifested as storms which frequently resulted in shipwrecks and drownings.

Bay of Assumption

Where is this?

Poros is a small island-pair in the southern part of the Saronic Gulf, separated from the Peloponnese by a 200m wide sea channel. A popular weekend destination for Athenians, Poros consists of two islands: Sphairia, the southern part, and Kalaureia, the northern and largest part. A bridge connects the two islands over a narrow strait. A lovely anchorage away from the crowded Poros Town is alongside the charming chapel on the the tiny island in the Bay of Assumption. 

Poros

Where is this?

The town of Poros is built amphitheatrically on the slopes of a hill, with its most famous landmark being the clock tower, built in 1927. The Archaeological Museum at Korizis Square, has findings from the Sanctuary of Poseidon, whose ruins are accessible on a hilltop close to the town. Visit the Holy Monastery of Zoodochos Pigi on the slope of a pine forest. Poros was the site of the first naval base in modern Greece, it is still used by the Hellenic Navy for training.

Make your own website in a few clicks! Mobirise helps you cut down development time by providing you with a flexible website editor with a drag and drop interface. MobiRise Website Builder creates responsive, retina and mobile friendly websites in a few clicks. Mobirise is one of the easiest website development tools available today. It also gives you the freedom to develop as many websites as you like given the fact that it is a desktop app.

Agistri

Where is this? 

Ahgistri is a pine covered island of tiny villages and crystal beaches, perfect for a relaxing holiday. A bus makes a tour of the island and leads to the beaches of Aponissos and Dragone. Traditionally visitors were so taken by the natural beauty of the island they were caught like fish on a hook and stayed for the rest of their lives, Agistri means fish-hook. The west coast has antiquities just below the sea surface, and also view archaeological findings in Megalochori.

Corinth Canal

Where is this?

The Corinth Canal which connects the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf was opened 1893, separating the Peloponnese from the Greek mainland. It is 6.3km long 6.5m deep and only 21-25m wide. Winds and currents flow strongly through the canal from either direction, We experiened this against us, as or 50hp engine struggled to maintain the 6 knot speed required by the canal controller, but then Aegean had just experienced its strongest winds in 100 years. The canal is too narrow for boats to pass each other, so contact the Corinth Canal Control on VHF ch11 to find out when to be at the canal entrance. There are waiting areas at both ends, after permission to enter has been granted, join a convoy with large ships at the head, do not follow too closely in order to avoid the prop wash. Isthmia (East End) first go to the office to port side of the channel to complete the paperwork and pay the fee, keep listening on VHF channel 11 for notification when you can proceed. The road bridge will lower and the lights will go green when it is safe to enter, if they stay red it indicates that W-E traffic is coming though and you must not attempt to enter. Poseidonia (West End) once you have clearance you must stay in contact with the controller. The road bridge will lower and the lights will go green when it is safe to enter, If they stay red it indicates that E-W traffic is coming though. After the transit you need to go alongside on the quay to starboard at the E end at Isthmia and go to the canal office to pay the fee. Be aware of the very strong turbulence created by large ships. Use plenty of spring lines and fenders. The canal is crossed by a railway line, a road and a motorway, limestone rock walls rise 90m above sea level. The canal was proposed in classical times, but many efforts to build it were abandoned, until it was finally completed in 1893. The narrowness of the canal makes navigation difficult, and traffic was far below what had been predicted. Another persistent problem is the heavily faulted nature of the sedimentary rock, in an active seismic zone, the canal's high limestone walls have been persistently unstable from the start, the wake from ships undermines the walls, causing landslides. This required retaining walls for more than half the length of the canal. Serious damage was caused during WW II, when German parachutists and glider troops attempted to capture the main bridge over the canal. The bridge was defended by the British and had been wired for demolition. The Germans were able to surprise the defenders with a glider-borne assault and captured the bridge, but the British were able to set off the charges and destroy the structure. Other authors maintain that German pioneers did cut the cables, thus securing the bridge, and it was a lucky shell by British artillery that triggered the explosion. 3 years later German forces used explosives to set off landslips to block the canal, destroyed the bridges and dumped locomotives, bridge wreckage and other infrastructure into the canal to hinder repair work.